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Help wanted: Job "dimensions" for CTA president position

So I heard there's a job opening at the CTA. The top job in fact. CTA President Ron Huberman has been tapped by Mayor Daley to run the Chicago Public Schools in the wake of the DC departure for former Supt. Arne Duncan.

All in all, I think Huberman served us -- his customers -- fairly well. Certainly there were some missteps, such as poor communications with passengers that led to a self-evacuation of the Blue Line. But there were many successes as well, such as slow zone repairs, expanded Bus Tracker and new Web site.

Based on how Daley uses his top lieutenants as chess pieces, moving them from one top job to another, chances are good that he'll pick someone from his most trusted inner circle to replace Huberman. As Fran Spielman notes in her take on the Huberman schools appointment: "The mayor has long believed that "good managers can manage anything" -- even if they don't have a clue about the agencies under their command."

But that doesn't mean we can't create our own job "dimensions" -- key characteristics, experience, abilities and skills -- that the new president should have. Here's my shot. I know you'll feel free to chime in.

  • Solid education and experience in managing large budgets, a huge unionized (for the most part) workforce and large capital assets. At minimum, MBA required, preferably in Finance or Management.
  • Seasoned executive who can think strategically and translate top-level business requirements into measureable goals and objectives.
  • Keen ability to make the best decisions under pressure. 
  • Must be a motivator and collaborator. Needs top-notch customer service know-how, including the ability to use innovative techniques to improve the customer experience.

That's a start. What say you?

Comments

Qualification # 1.
Someone that's an actual user of the CTA, not some jerk that drives to work every day!

Huberman did a very good job at the CTA IMO. Given the constraints he was under at the agency, he really did a great job of making positive change. Unfortunately, a lot of previous decisions are still working their way through the system. But I think we'll continue to see benefits from Huberman's more rider-centric approach.

One important qualification of the job is that the person should be committed to staying the course with Huberman's program and not just change things around for the sake of putting his stamp on the agency.

Let's make this a real job posting. In addition to listing the qualities a candidate should have, we should list the perks of the job.

1. approx $200K salary
2. Excellent health benefits (questionable retirement benefits)
3. Full-time driver(s) (errand boy) plucked from the ranks of the bus and train operators.
4. Three agency cars at your disposal. One to remain parked in front of your residence. One to remain parked at your office. One for your driver to use to shuttle you to and from work and appointments. Said driver gets to take that car home after he drops you off at a northside station to ride the train for a few stops and make an appearance.
5. Several high-paying positions ($120K+) that you can hand out to your friends
6. Authority to create as many more positions as you want for your friends - despite the fact that you may be laying off other employees just before they reach retirement eligibility.


Anybody else have any more additions?

Perhaps someone who sticks around for more than 21 months would be a good idea. RonH never even got to the terrible twos of his tenure.

I say instead of just reporting the decision to move Huberman, CTA Tattler should voice an opinion on whether the move is a good idea. This website is a thought-leader regarding CTA public sentiment, and I'm sure the media and motivated members of the riding public would like to know if you are for or against this move.

Taking a position on it is a important thing to do--we are all Chicago citizens, this is our city, and our voice matters. I took my own position over on Chicago Carless. Daley had a bad idea. Bad. Bad. Bad.

Martha -
Ron had to get out of there. The shaky house of cards he had constructed is getting ready to fall apart. All the other maintenance needs that were left undone/unfunded while he focused on the high-profile slow zones are starting to cause crises. The signals and switches are in horrible shape. Also, they are laying off 50 more people this month or next. And there is talk they used substandard materials/processes on the slow zone removal areas and now there are a whole set of new problems.

Finally, he spent so much money on the high-profile projects he touted, while other needs languished, that he way overspent. New tax revenue or not, the CTA is in so much money trouble that several vendors are not getting paid and have refused to do any more work.

We are passengers, not customers.

Martha -
Ron had to get out of there. The shaky house of cards he had constructed is getting ready to fall apart. All the other maintenance needs that were left undone/unfunded while he focused on the high-profile slow zones are starting to cause crises. The signals and switches are in horrible shape. Also, they are laying off 50 more people this month or next. And there is talk they used substandard materials/processes on the slow zone removal areas and now there are a whole set of new problems.

Finally, he spent so much money on the high-profile projects he touted, while other needs languished, that he way overspent. New tax revenue or not, the CTA is in so much money trouble that several vendors are not getting paid and have refused to do any more work.

Great. So now he can come do the same to CPS. I guess we can expect all sorts of great new "initiatives" that merely repackage what's done before but channel money to the politically-connected consultants who did the repackaging.

Daley said at the press conference yesterday that he always sleeps well when Ronnie's on the job. How many sleeping pills must he take before he goes beddy-bye?

[[I say instead of just reporting the decision to move Huberman, CTA Tattler should voice an opinion on whether the move is a good idea.
Mike Doyle]]

All hail Mike Doyle!! - the arbiter of what other bloggers should do/write on their own blogs.

(Oh, wait, that's just a shameless, self-promoting attempt to increase traffic to his blog.)

Jim,

What proof do you have of these statements? I'm not doubting you, but is there any evidence to back up your claims?

I don't think an MBA is required, but it could help. MBA could be helpful if it comes from a top university, otherwise I don't think it is all it's cracked up to be.

I hope whoever they pick that they do it soon so that initiatives like Bus Tracker don't stall.

At least Mike Doyle has thoughtful analysis. With the Tribune reporting less and less, the last thing we need is for blogs to copy-and-paste the news and press releases without analyzing the pros and cons.

Mike does it. The Tattler could do it.

Keep it up Mike.

Unindicted Co-Conspirator,

I agree with you. I believe that is why people noticed an improvement in the CTA; because Ron rode the rails and smelled the piss and institutued a new cleaning policy. If any we can point at that and say "Ron did good".

I liked his thinking outside the box on some things (standing room only cars for rush hour), and being pragmatic for others (foregoing some expansions because they just weren't in the budget).

Huberman wasn't perfect, but there is only so much you can do with a mass transit system that is chronically underfunded by design.

I also disagree about the MBA thing. Bush got an MBA from Harvard, and what good did that do?

Cut out the "customer" thing. It's a word that government types all over the country started to use in earnest about a decade ago because it sounds better from a PR point-of-view, and is meant to give citizens a warm, fuzzy feeling that government is being run like an (allegedly) efficient business. But we are not customers, we are citizens (or, in if you want, mere passengers). That's an important difference. We pay tax dollars, and government does not collect revenues in a business sense, nor is government geared to make a profit. There is a huge difference between customers and citizens--mainly, businesses are designed to serve only their customers and make profits, while government is charged with serving, in theory, all citizens in a specific area. Granted, this does not apply to passengers who are not legal citizens, but I hope you see the larger point.

From Greg Hinz's blog on Crain's:

"In the wake of Mr. Huberman's departure, Dennis Anosike, the CTA's top-notch chief financial officer, has submitted his resignation. His will be the first of a series."

I'd be willing to bet there are plenty of people who ride RTA that are not citizens. What are you supposed to call them if not customers? You're paying for a service, thus you are a customer. Buy the ticket, take the ride.

I'd be willing to bet there are plenty of people who ride RTA that are not citizens. What are you supposed to call them if not customers? You're paying for a service, thus you are a customer. Buy the ticket, take the ride.

I wonder why they are resigning. Seems like a good oppportunity to move up the ladder, if you want to...

Let me be the first to say Huberman was on the right track.Why don't you take the job Kevin?You know a little bit about the C.T.A.And you can't be accused of being a yes man hack.

While strong management skills are definitely critical, I don't see how people in these positions (CTA, Schools) can lead with an effective vision without having an in-depth knowledge of the policy. I don't think it's unreasonable to believe there's someone with both qualities somewhere out there in this great nation. If only Daley would take the time and care to actually look instead of just grabbing someone standing in front of him.

I'd add these points to the job description:
-- Understands the goals of transportation and transit. The CTA is not a private company and riders are not "customers" any more than city drivers parking on our streets are. A primary goal should be to increase ridership to make it easier for people to get around and to get more cars off our streets.
-- Understands the relationship between transit and land use. The CTA needs to have a very close relationship with CMAP and the city planning dept. and should be pursuing innovative initiatives to spur transit-oriented development rather than simply selling off valuable assets next-door to transit stations. These properties could be long-term revenue generators.
-- Ability to win trust/funding from state (and federal) legislature. The above goal cannot be met without getting transit funding up to the same level or above how much we subsidize driving.

would george krambles, if he were alive today, meet the "dimensions" here?

is it even possible anymore to rise through the ranks at all? i don't mean like going from bus driver to VP in the course of a career, that's just not the way things work anymore. but can you ever get promoted internally all the way to the top, or do you merely have to be a member of the Managerial Class?

I'll add to Carfree Chicago's salient points:

- Change the recovery ratio mandated by the legislature. A 50% fare box recovery is absurd, relative to other transit agencies across the nation. The result is higher fares and less funds allocated to capital needs.

- Scrap any law that allows for certain classes to ride free of charge. I'm all for reduced fares for certain classes, particularly students, the disabled, the poor, and perhaps seniors to a limited extent (i.e. based on income), but we've headed down a slippery slope as a result of our disgraced governor's penchant for unwarranted shiny new populist agendas.

- Considering Ron's reputation as a "numbers" guy, I'm a little disappointed at his inability to get traction with the state legislators for more funding based on empirical data. I realize that his predecessor's malfeasance and general state financial troubles played a part, but anyways.

The next batch of CTA suits should be flooding Springfield with metrics as to how mass transit is both favorable from an economic and environmental point of view.

"Newly-installed Chicago Public Schools chief Ron Huberman today was booed by a crowd of parents, teachers and community officials upset about plans to close and reorganize 22 schools."

http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/01/crowd-boos-new-chicago-schools-chief.html

(Maybe they weren't booing him; they were chanting Huuuuuuuuuuuuuuberman.)

Mike Doyle,

Do you know how to read? Kevin already clearly stated what he thought about this, both in regards to the CTA and the Chicago Public Shcools.

"and I'm sure the media and motivated members of the riding public would like to know if you are for or against this move.

Taking a position on it is a important thing to do--we are all Chicago citizens, this is our city, and our voice matters. I took my own position over on Chicago Carless. Daley had a bad idea. Bad. Bad. Bad."

For all you sanctimonious talk about how you wish Kevin would give his opinions more, this blog sure gets a lot of traffic and comments. And when people comment they are getting their "voice" to "matter" as "Chicago citiizans". I would suspect that one of the reasons why this blogs gets so much comments is because Kevin does not state his opinions in an in-your-face angry tone like some other bloggers. So it is not persuasive to act as if it is somehow morally inferior to have a more objective style because supposidely that would prevent people having their "voices matter" I haven't looked at you blog so I cannot comment on it.

I think they should pick me...I'd whip the CTA into shape.

KevinB

Ron did the best job he could do with the cluster he was handed from Kruesi. And unfortunately, even if he wanted to stay, he can't. He does what the mayor tells him to do. I suspect one of the cronies he brought with him from the mayor's office will take over his post, maybe Sarah Kremsner, considering her current role in Performance Mgmt.

I've always felt "passenger" is more appropriate for transportation than "customer". I didn't much like being called "guest" by Target either. It just rubs me the wrong way when somebody at the top of a company decides to redefine the relationship with the customer by making up some Newspeak, without even asking how the customer feels about it. Somehow it seems to take the place of actual respect.

I prefer the term "rider" personally, and you see it in common use.

First, forget the MBA. Bush had one, from Yale, yet. Most of the architects of our current economic meltdown had MBAs or something close. We'd do about as well requiring a certificate in astrology.

I think the requirements are much simpler: a smart person with management experience. Experience massaging the swollen egos of the idiots in Springfield who control our money. Proven ability to communicate with her/his constituency. No felony convictions. Demonstrated partisan for trains and public transportation. Demonstrated activism for energy conservation and environmental protection.

Required to use non-private auto transportation for all travel, business or personal, within Cook County.

Personally, I'll miss Huberman. He did a good job, considering the history of what he inherited. Daley screwed up on this one.

Although I've disagreed with him on some issues, I'm willing to back KevinB for this job.

While he might have to depend on some more experienced transit professionals to help him get the job done, his focus would be on improving operations. He's certainly shown he doesn't give a shit whether it looks good to the rest of the world, he's going to focus on getting the job done right, rather than on making it look like he's doing a good job.

Huberman's cronies were all people who could help him make it look like he was doing a good job. Not a transit professional in the bunch. No one who knew anything about operations, because Huberman was never really concerned with operations.

The people who are abandoning the CTA ship first are the ones who know where the bodies have been burried. Without protection from above, they become vunlerable as scapegoats. They want to get out as quickly as they can in order to put as much distance between their departure, and when people discover the bodies.

But I don't have a lot of hope that Daily will hire anyone who knows how to operate a transit system. He's going to appoint someone else who'll be in charge of making things look good. Someone who can build a nice facad.

If we have to have someone who knows nothing about transit, I hope that it'll be someone who knows Excel better than Powerpoint. But with our luck, it'll be someone who knows Publisher better than Powerpoint, and runs Excel only long enough to cut and paste tables into Publisher.

On the other hand, I'll bet KevinB even knows something about Access. But even so, I'd expect him to spend more time actually holding people accountable. Of course he'll start with those responsible for the 22, but you gotta start somewhere!

I don't think you need an MBA to be an effective manager or to be an expert on budgets.

The other two great turnaround stories in Chicago government were Forrest Claypool at the Chicago Park District and Paul Vallas at the Chicago Public Schools.

Claypool was an attorney who had served as a media aide to Paul Simon and Pat Quinn, and became Daley's chief of staff (the same position Huberman would later hold). Vallas has only a bachelor's degree and had served as budget director under Daley and as a budget aide to the Illinois Senate president.

I'm not necessarily defending Huberman's appointment to the CPS, but the general principle that you can draw from Claypool at the CPD, Vallas at the CPS, and Huberman at the CTA is that strong, *uncorrupt* managers can come from diverse experiences and educational backgrounds. They can be effective in Chicago government when Daley gives them the political cover to make real changes. During their tenures, all three greatly improved their agencies' budgetary situations and focused on core service areas. The three also greatly reduced -- though probably did not eliminate! -- patronage in their agencies, again because Daley gave them the political cover to do so, something he does when the mismanagement starts to become an embarrassing political liability for him.

And just to note, I've heard that Phil Kline did similarly reformist things at the Chicago Police Department. I don't want to take that away from him, but I also don't enough about whether that's accurate to really comment.

Kevin B is right! Now's the perfect time for someone on the Tattler message board to take the reins of the CTA. I mean, with all the terrific ideas and brilliant discussions that have taken place over the years on this board, someone must have adequate skills to run the agency. I'm sure in no time we'd get billions in federal funding, no bus bunching, new equipment, friendly staff, L cars that don't smell like urine............okay, I'm being completely sarcastic!

"there were many successes as well, such as slow zone repairs, expanded Bus Tracker and new Web site."

If my recollection is correct (and I'm pretty sure that it is) the bus tracker program was started by Kruesi. There were bus routes on a pilot project years ago. This is something that you cannot implement in a month or two. It takes a long period time to do testing and to implement the technology. So I have no idea why anyone would be giving Huberman the credit for this. Hopefully, I will get hired as a CEO for a company tomorrow and my predesessor will have several projects planned and ready to go. All I will have to do is go ahead with them and I will receive all the credit. That's the way the world works.

I've already explained in previous threads why I think Huberman gets way too much credit for the slow zone repairs but there are actually some things one could argue to suggest that maybe someone else wouldn't have gone as far as he did. But there is no reason that anybody should be giving him any significant credit for the bus tracker. I'm not even going to get into the website.

Well, considering I use the system quite extensively on a daily basis, both bus and train, I have a demonstrated problem solving ability, management skills when I chose to exercise them, I'm a no-nonsense (except when posting on blogs) kinda guy and quite frankly I can't figure how I could do a worse job than Frank did....My failing would be that I don't have a penchant for kissing ass and I don't really consider that a down side. I have a few political contacts and could extend them as needed.

I don't have a problem delegating when appropriate, but at the same time, I've been into situations when I don't have the requisite subject area experience, had to pick it up via OJT, but still managed to get the job done. I consider myself a champion of the underdog and persistent as a bulldog.

Sounds like a definite skill set that could get the job done.

KevinB

Let me get back to Mike Doyle's comments:

"This website is a thought-leader regarding CTA public sentiment, and I'm sure the media and motivated members of the riding public would like to know if you are for or against this move."

I'm not sure what leads you to believe that the media reads this website. In fact, everything to me indicates that the Tribune, at least, doesn't. There have been numerous compaints here about Jon Hilkevitch's amaturish reporting (even though he's had the same job for at least a decade) and they have not taken any action. Not only have they not fired or moved him to a less damaging job but they don't even seem to do any basic editing of his articles. As I've said, nearly every article of his contains things which are false, misleading, or are not relevant to the context he is attempting to put them into. Here is his unfortunate work for today: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-huberman-cta-28-jan28,0,2350202.story

Truly unbelievable. How do you like this quote: "the transit agency still didn't figure out how to communicate with customers as effectively as it should or pay enough attention to the complaints and suggestions of riders, according to feedback the agency has received." Wow! There is feedback from people stating that they don't do certain things well! Jesus! That certainly makes the CTA unique. I mean, we know that it is rare for any business or other government agency to have some negative feedback. So if they do, it certainly shows that there has been some failure in leadership. (that was sarcasm, Jon, if you are reading this)

There is also a statement from him complaining (even though this is a news story and he is a reporter) that there are still some bus unreliability. Jeeze. You think? I mean, this is a city of a few million people where a good portion takes the bus every day. And at the end, for reasons that are inexplicable to me, he quotes "a community organizer with the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization". Perhaps someone could shed a little light on why this person, out of the millions in the city, somehow is worth being one of only a few people quoted in the article about Huberman's tenure. And in this quote is at least one complete falsehood, that there are stations currently closed on the west side green and blue lines. As a reporter who is being paid by a news orgainazation, one would think Hilkevitch would either choose not to quote something that is false or at least mention the inaccuracy. That is sort of what newpapers are saying seperates them from blogs. Obviously, there is a reason why Huberman has not risen above the transportation reporter for at least a decade. This is not normally a position where people stay for a long time (the Sun-times has had three transportation reporters in just the last five years and Hilkevitch's predessesor later became the city hall reporter). But the Tribune needs to do more than simply not promote him. The transportation beat is too important to have someone who probably couldn't even pass a good college journalism class with more than a "D".

And one also would think that Hilkevitch, as the tranportation reporter, would regularly read this website. It is, after all, one of the most read pages in his beat. Yet nothing indicates he has read the comments about him. At least he hasn't shown any improvement.

A couple of notes to MK:

Yes sir, you are correct that the Bus Tracker pilot started in August 2006 under Kruesi with just one route. But I specifically wrote that Huberman "expanded" Bus Tracker.

And thanks for noting that I have made my opinions known on the Huberman issue.

Finally, at the risk of tooting my own horn here, I can assure you that members of the media read this site. I base that on the number of media calls I get asking for comments on CTA matters. Yesterday I was interviewed on a radio show about Huberman.

Also note the category "CTA Tattler in the News":

http://www.ctatattler.com/cta_tattler_in_the_news/

Cheers!

Kevin

Well, that is certainly correct that Huberman expanded the bus tracker. Of course, the very definition of a pilot project is to start something small for the future purpose of expanding it when it can be confirmed that it has a degree of success and is working well. It seems clear that it would have been expanded no matter who was in charge of the CTA. But if you want to give Huberman credit for doing so, go ahead.

There is no doubt that some members of the media read the ctatattler. But unfortunetely, I think some of the folks at the Tribune are a little behind the times and sometimes think it is beneath them to read a blog. I have seen many newspaper editors (though I don't recall any specifically from the Tribune) make snobbish comments about blogs in general. I would hope that the least the editors (or other Tribune executives) would do is google some of their reporters names and see what people are saying about them. I always make sure to spell Hilkevitch's name correctly, largely for that purpose. Hilkevitch himself seems to avoid doing anything that takes any time so I doubt he reads this blog.

MBAs are way overrated, unless they're from a British university. The American MBA is all about analysis, and has almost nothing to do with developing a good manager. You can analyze everything to death but at the end, if you can't implement, if you can't keep track of things, if you can't motivate, and if you can't organize, it isn't going to amount to very much.

The new CTA chief in all likelihood is going to face:

a) the consequences of years of using substandard materials for infrastructure, some of it in recent projects
b) a revenue base that is structurally designed to decline in real terms because of how our sales tax exempts services, the fastest growing portion of our tax base
c) major infrastructure problems, notably the North Main and the Evanston purple line, for which nothing has even been designed much less planned and budgeted
d) further problems due to the state's lack of capital funding, which already resulted in Huberman having to shuffle money around in strange ways to pay for the slow zone programs
e) a mayor who has never attached a high priority to the CTA beyond occasions when there is a massive public outcry
f) a funding system that practically discourages the mayor from attaching a high priority to the CTA, since there isn't much he can do about it financially given the way Illinois makes the state government responsible for transit funding
g) a state that is financially responsible for the CTA, but disinterested because it doesn't politically control the management, and incapable because it is broke

Talk about a recipe for failure.

[And in this quote is at least one complete falsehood, that there are stations currently closed on the west side green and blue lines.]

Actually, it is true.

As you probably know, when the Green Line was rebuilt, several stations were closed and not reopened. Some of those stations have been demolished, like the ones on the former Jackson Park branch.

Some, however, still remain. The 58th St. and Racine platforms are apparently still there. According to Chicago-L.org, the Racine station house is even still intact.

Similarly, there are a few old stations on the Forest Park branch that are closed but still intact. I believe they are at California, Kostner and Central. Take a ride out there sometime, see for yourself.

We can debate whether opening these stations would be a good idea or not (I have my doubts, especially on the Blue Line), but the dude's statement is correct in any case.

I rode the Forest Park blue line to Oak Park once and didn't notice anything resembling a station. I'm pretty confident I would have noticed and remembered if there was anything like that. Perhaps there is some partial stations that haven't completely been dismantled yet. But it seems to clearly be incorrect to say, as he did, that "there are stations closed".

DBX,

Please feel free to explain why you believe that Daley does not attach a high priority to the CTA. It seems to me that Daley did an excellent job manuvering the "doomsday" threats that caused the state to give the CTA everything it wanted. For obvious tactical reasons, he didn't take a very visable public role for that fight. But he clearly was very involved is setting up the stratagy that won the increased funding. And he did this dispute huge critism from many people (including, unfortunely, some here) who just wanted him to deliver more soundbites so that they could feel better. Of course, had he done so many of the suburban and downstate legisltors would have received numerous angry phone calls and e-mails from their constituants complaining about what they saw as bailing out Chicago. And nothing like the bill that passed would have.

Only a mayor like Daley who is concerned much more about the future of the city than his own popularity could have done something like that. And he also has been very vocal about the need for more capital funding from the state and federal government. So I don't understand why you believe this is not a priority to him. Perhaps you could elaberate. He has done some things very poorly with regard to the CTA (obviously block 37 is the major example of that). But that doesn't have anything to do with not giving priority to the CTA.

"Only a mayor like Daley who is concerned much more about the future of the city than his own popularity could have done something like that. "

MK, that's absurd. Mayor Daley cares only about the Olympics for the purpose of securing his legacy, and has reigned supreme over the CTA while it has been woefully neglected despite a significant uptick in ridership.

As for the future, this is the mayor who can't sell city assets for pennies on the dollar quick enough to fund his patronage armies and fiefdoms. This is the mayor who's sitting a multimillion dollar slush fund (TIF) in order to maintain a stranglehold on the city council. A mayor who pays out millions each year to lawsuits for police brutality and Shakman noncompliance. A mayor who has categorically refused to demand our disgraced governor resign.

He thinks nothing about the future, and has recently said as much. A friend to the CTA, he ain't.

[I rode the Forest Park blue line to Oak Park once and didn't notice anything resembling a station. I'm pretty confident I would have noticed and remembered if there was anything like that.]

Well, you can be as "pretty confident" as you want, but you're still utterly, totally wrong.

"For obvious tactical reasons, he didn't take a very visable public role for that fight"

What are these 'obvious tactical reasons?' I see no reason for Daley to be shy about supporting the CTA if he gave a hoot about transit. Which he doesn't.

Cheryl,

I answered that question in my post. I suggest you read it. Sometimes the best thing to do isn't always what gets the most attention.

Doc,

Could you please show me a quote that indicates that Daley "thinks nothing about the future, and has recently said as much". I'm also a bit baffled as to why you think it is so important whether he publicly states Blagojevich should resign or not. He obviously isn't supportive of him (and he never has been, including well before these charges were brought).

The whole problem with looking for a candidate can be summarized by Tattler's post. Nowhere did the author mention any prior transit-related work history. Understanding a railroad and transit system is something best done by those who are involved in the industry; why not make it a requirement for this job, as well?

Huberman was Joe the Plumber at the right time. Improved communications, the new website, bus tracker...etc. Many of those projects had been in pilot for years, and he just happened to be the guy sitting at the helm when they got approved. To this day, Huberman still doesn't understand many of operational issues facing CTA.

That's what you get for looking for an MBA.

The Kostner stop was added years on the Congress Line after it was moved from the Garfield L tracks.
There was a lot of screaming about what a waste of money it was as there was an entrance to the Pulaski stop at Keeler, just a quarter mile away.
It's believed that someone with a lot of clout was behind it, but I don't remember the details.

KevinB For CTA President!!!!!!!

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